Elegy written in a country churchyard analysis by stanza. Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard by Thomas Gray: Summary and Analysis 2019-03-09

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From “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” by Thomas Gray The curfew tolls the knell of parting

elegy written in a country churchyard analysis by stanza

Since then Elegy has been a hit among the reader, owning to its classical richness and the universal thought of leaving empty handed, which stir so much emotion! The two separated in Italy in 1741 after a quarrel, and Gray continued the journey on his own. In the larger scope, though, the position that Gray takes is that all people, poor or rich, are equal. This apparently was the reason why he felt the need to go to such lengths to help his readers know the simple country people he was writing about. You have noticed the parallel structure of the first two lines. He entered Cambridge for his higher studies but left on 1738 without having a proper degree to pursue law in London. Its influence was felt immediately, not only in England, but all over Europe. How bowed the woods beneath their sturdy stroke! It is an unusual conception that allows Gray to break through the natural terror of dying in order to forge a relationship between a fear of death and an acceptance of that death.

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Poem of the week: Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard by Thomas Gray

elegy written in a country churchyard analysis by stanza

Their very ashes contain a fire of life that the speaker senses he is missing, and, thus, they are the object of his sympathetic projection. It says he was a young person of humble birth, a scholar and a poet, who experienced depression. On some fond breast the parting soul relies, Some pious drops the closing eye requires; Ev'n from the tomb the voice of Nature cries, Ev'n in our Ashes live their wonted Fires. A narrative of events written year by year, or 2. The story that the Swain tells us works to make Gray the subject of the poem and mimics the poetic action that Gray hoped someone would undertake after his death. In lines 77 to 92, the speaker is touched by the shared humanity of the poor people.


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Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard: Stanza 3 Summary

elegy written in a country churchyard analysis by stanza

In the end, the oppressive system of feudal land ownership was abolished, but only at the end of a bitter struggle that required both sides to focus their attention on jingoistic slogans. After all, one thing is clear in a graveyard—it is the final resting-place for all social classes. He shows the beauty in the misspelled inscriptions in the tombstone, some unpolished and consoling biblical verses and poorly decorated shapeless sculpture. The thirteenth stanza points out two factors that contributed to the unfulfilled dreams of common men: the lack of knowledge and poverty. This lack of plain support fuels the next, undeniably dramatic, development.


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From “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” by Thomas Gray The curfew tolls the knell of parting

elegy written in a country churchyard analysis by stanza

The paths of glory lead but to the grave. And if we recall that the putative topography of the poem is Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire, this history becomes even geographically immediate to Gray, who is putting the finishing touches on his Elegy at Stoke. What major observation does the speaker make in the first stanza? In fact, the churchyard of the poem seems to have been taken over by leisured upper-class sentimentalists who have presumably earned the right to such leisure. Their name, their years, spelt by the unlettered Muse, The place of fame and elegy supply: And many a holy text around she strews, That teach the rustic moralist to die. Gray uses the many loaded images that come with sickle to suggest death resides within everyday actions.

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Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard Summary & Study Guide

elegy written in a country churchyard analysis by stanza

In this final stanza, Gray separates himself from his merits and his frailties. Gray depicts country peasants as virtuous simply because they lack money and eduction, suggesting that money and eduction are corrupting. Here the speaker reveals the simple life of the lower class people who wakes up at the song of birds and enjoys hard work. The simple and slow-moving stanza form is here handled with great skill. Like earlier, Neoclassical poetry, Pre-Romantic poetry is characterized by the following features: The polished expression of ideas The use of balanced phrases and sophisticated vocabulary At the same time, Pre-Romantic poetry anticipates Romantic literature by introducing the following elements: A new focus on nature and the life of common folk The expression of heightened, sometimes nameless feelings Let's take a closer look at a passage from Thomas Gray's poem to get an idea of polished expression, balanced phrases, and sophisticated vocabulary.

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Summary of Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard by Thomas Gray

elegy written in a country churchyard analysis by stanza

The poet denies this figure of all potential radical action. Gray seems to ignore the other vices that may affect these people in order to comment on the society in which he lives. In the eighth stanza, the speaker simply affirms that regardless of status in life, all people will die Cummings. Large was his bounty, and his soul sincere, Heaven did a recompense as largely send: He gave to Misery all he had, a tear, He gained from Heaven 'twas all he wished a friend. In 1757 Gray was offered the position of Poet Laureate, but he declined it. This present page provides a detailed analysis of elegy written in a country churchyard from stanza 7 to stanza 11.

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Summary of Thomas Gray’s: “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard”

elegy written in a country churchyard analysis by stanza

The fourteenth stanza contains the most identified lines in the entire poem Cummings. Instead they died unknown because of their poverty. Curfew- In medieval times, curfew refers to- the ringing of a bell to prompt people to extinguish fires and lights. In this section,we have learned the following: Eighteenth-century Pre-Romantic poetry shares characteristics of two different styles: earlier Neoclassical poetry and Romantic literature. Though lineage determines where one ultimately ends up, in the grave yard or the crypt, and what they spend their days doing, real ability lies in the heart, hands, and mind. In the fifteenth stanza, the speaker mentions significant figures whose footsteps the common men would have followed if only they were given the chance.

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Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard: Stanza 3 Summary

elegy written in a country churchyard analysis by stanza

Lines 5-8 The second stanza sustains the somber tone of the first: the speaker is not mournful, but pensive, as he describes the peaceful landscape that surrounds him. The cattle were slowly moving to shelter, as they passed through the fields, and so did the farmers, who were walking heavily after the day's hard work. Newton published this theory in his book Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica in 1687, and it marked a turning point in the history of science. Gray uses this metaphor to characterize the forgotten peasants buried in the graveyard as extremely worthy recipients of knowledge so that their lack of knowledge seems tragic. The paths of glory lead but to the grave. At first sight the gentle Miltonic melancholy and peaceful setting seem to be in keeping with a contemporary taste for the pastoral poetry of Virgil or Theocritus. He notes that even if they were not powerful or great, and even if they do not have an elaborate memorial of the sort mentioned in line 38, they still deserve homage or tribute.

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Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard

elegy written in a country churchyard analysis by stanza

The speaker observes the end of the day as life winds down and darkness sets in. How bowed the woods beneath their sturdy stroke! She is a graduate of the acclaimed creative writing program in poetry at Boston University, where she received the Fitzgerald Award in Translation. Note that the syntax of this line is slightly confusing. Their tombs are side by side with the rich, under the same ornamented arched floor of the church from where one could also hear the lofty music. Poetry often presents readers with challenges different from those presented by prose. Let's take a look at an example of paraphrasing. Yet even these bones from insult to protect, Some frail memorial still erected nigh, With uncouth rhymes and shapeless sculpture decked, Implores the passing tribute of a sigh.

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Thomas Gray: Poems Essay

elegy written in a country churchyard analysis by stanza

He was hardly the revolutionary. A sustained archeology of the material history of the poem, however, needs to be done. Gray's 'Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard' is the culmination of the literature of melancholy as well as of the Churchyard school. The incapability of the rustics to raise a memory or a commemorations over their tomb does make them low. This is reflected in the egoism in believing that having the body of a beloved young man from a good home among them is somehow an enriching experience for the rural dead.

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